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As the largest resource of information specific to women's brain health, we are sure you will find what you are looking for, and promise that you will discover new information.

Why gender is a crucial — but overlooked — factor in heart disease

In most European countries, women with myocardial infarction come much later to emergency departments than men. Once in the hospital, they are diagnosed later than men. Diagnosis does not always lead to a positive result,...

Possible drawback of Alzheimer’s medication

A UCLA researcher has found that one of the most commonly prescribed medications for Alzheimer’s disease may accelerate the cognitive decline of patients who carry a genetic variation. Sophie Sokolow, an associate professor at...

High blood sugar can also lead to Alzheimer’s

When you think of high blood sugar, you probably automatically associate it with obesity and diabetes. But according to a new study published in Scientific Reports, it can also lead to Alzheimer’s disease, a degenerative...

New images of early stage Alzheimer’s disease

Researchers at Lund University in Sweden have used the MAX IV synchrotron in Lund – the strongest of its kind in the world – to produce images that predate the formation of toxic clumps of beta-amyloid, the...

Opioid pain medication works differently on women than men

A female brain’s resident immune cells are more active in regions involved in pain processing relative to males, according to a recent study by Georgia State University researchers. The study, published in the Journal of Neuroscience, found...

Dizziness when standing linked to dementia

Those dizzy spells felt when standing up too quickly have been linked to cognitive decline and dementia later in life. US scientists believe the brief drop in blood pressure that causes the...

Study shows marijuana users have low blood flow to the brain

As the U.S. races to legalize marijuana for medicinal and recreational use, a new, large scale brain imaging study gives reason for caution. Published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease, researchers using single photon emission computed tomography...

Autoimmune disease may be linked to heightened dementia risk

Autoimmune diseases, such as multiple sclerosis and coeliac disease, may be linked to a heightened risk of dementia, indicates a large long term study published in the Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health March 1, 2017. Researchers...

Heart Risks in Middle Age Boost Dementia Risk Later in Life

People who have heart disease risks in middle age – such as diabetes, high blood pressure or smoking – are at higher risk for dementia later in life, according to research presented at the American Stroke...

Sleep habits could predict your dementia risk

Researchers at Boston University Medical Center have just made a remarkable discovery, and one that could change how we diagnose dementia in its early stages. They’ve found that sleep habits could predict...

Rambling or being long-winded may be a sign of dementia

Rambling and long-winded speech in middle or old age may be an early warning of approaching Alzheimer’s, research has found. Taking longer to choose the right word, or using ten where five would do,...

Long-Term Hormone Therapy May Provide Dementia Protection

New research suggests postmenopausal estrogen-based hormone therapy lasting longer than ten years may reduce the risk of Alzheimer’s disease. Investigators from the University of Eastern Finland performed the large study that explored the...

Depression or dementia? Brain SPECT imaging helps distinguish them

Does a patient have depression or a cognitive disorder (CD) such as Alzheimer’s disease or both? Since both disorders have overlapping symptoms, how can a clinician tell them apart to make an appropriate diagnosis? In a new...

Toronto researchers turn to high-tech help to prevent dementia

  Everyone can make lifestyle choices to prevent Alzheimer’s dementia, but we’re now exploring a promising approach using technology, rather than pills, to help people at...

Exercise may be #1 way to prevent dementia

Regular exercise in middle age is the best lifestyle change a person can make to prevent cognitive decline in their later years, a 20-year study finds. Abnormalities in brain tissue begin several decades before the onset...

Maintaining a healthy weight could prevent Alzheimer’s

There is a surprising link between being overweight in mid-life and early development of Alzheimer’s disease. As part of a 14-year study known as the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging (BLSA), researchers from the National...

Glucose levels in the brain may be earliest sign of Alzheimer’s

Memory loss and cognitive decline are commonly thought to be the earliest signs of the disorder, but a new study has found declines in glucose levels in the brain come even sooner. Even better? The same team...

Bilinguals may have an edge against Alzheimer’s

People who speak two or more languages appear to weather the ravages of Alzheimer’s disease better than people who have only mastered one language, a new Italian study suggests. Bilingual people with Alzheimer’s outperformed single-language...

Drug Halts Alzheimer’s Related Tau Damage in Brain

Under ordinary circumstances, the protein tau contributes to the normal, healthy functioning of brain neurons. In some people, though, it collects into toxic tangles that damage brain cells. Such tangles are a hallmark of Alzheimer’s and...

Alzheimer’s Roots May Go All The Way Back To The Womb

Alzheimer’s disease afflicts mostly those in advanced age. Many believe that Alzheimer’s disease starts late in life. A study though shows that Alzheimer’s roots may go all the way back to the womb. The study...

Why do people with Alzheimer’s stop recognizing their loved ones?

Alzheimer’s not only steals people’s memories but also their ability to recognize faces, which widens the gulf between people with this disease and their loved ones. A recent study has demonstrated that, beyond causing memory problems,...

Excess tau protein damages brain’s GPS

Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) researchers have discovered that the spatial disorientation that leads to wandering in many Alzheimer’s disease patients is caused by the accumulation of tau protein in navigational nerve cells in the brain. The...

High blood pressure onset in late life may protect against dementia

The Journal of the Alzheimer’s Association suggest that onset of high blood pressure later in life is associated with lower dementia risk after age 90, especially if...

Ministrokes may contribute to dementia

Evidence overwhelmingly supports a link between cognitive decline and cerebrovascular diseases such as atherosclerosis, arteriolosclerosis, and cerebral amyloid angiopathy. Not only do individuals with cerebrovascular diseases have a much higher incidence of cortical microinfarcts (mini-strokes), but post-mortem...

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