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why did we start
Women’s Brain Health Initiative?

It was frightening to learn that women suffer from depression, stroke and dementia twice as much as men and an astounding 70% of new Alzheimer’s patients will be women. Yet research still focuses on men. We want to correct this research bias.

Women’s Brain Health Initiative creates education programs and funds research to combat
brain-aging diseases that affect women.

Care to join us? 

70%

of Alzheimer’s sufferers are women.
You can’t ignore a number this big.

Better thinking
from tips to science

The largest curated resource of information specific to women’s brain health.

Mind the Gap

Approximately two-thirds of those diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) are women. However, research into sex and gender differences in AD is astonishingly limited. Because the greatest risk factor for dementia is age, the discrepancy between the sexes has historically been attributed to the longevity of women. While it is true…

Antibiotic treatment alleviates Alzheimer’s symptoms but only in male mice

Researchers at The University of Chicago have demonstrated that the type of bacteria living in the gut can influence the development of Alzheimer's disease symptoms in mice. The study, which will be published May 16 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, shows that, by altering the gut microbiome, long-term antibiotic treatment reduces inflammation…

Brain changes linked with Alzheimer’s years before symptoms appear

In a records review of 290 people at risk for Alzheimer's disease, scientists say they have identified an average level of biological and anatomical brain changes linked to Alzheimer's disease that occur three to 10 years -- some even more than 30 years -- before the disease's first recognizable symptoms appear.…

how to get involved

Whether you’re a family member worried about the women in your life, worried about yourself or a corporation who cares, it is easy to get involved.

donate

We educate woman and the scientific community about this issue and fund research for the cause.

Every dollars helps.

Who will you give for?

membership

Membership gives you the opportunity to participate in driving the women’s brain health conversation forward.

Will you join us?

partners & sponsors

All of your female employees are at risk, and everyone they know is affected.

Your support is important.

Will you help?

Book Club
or Social Group

Bring copies of MIND OVER MATTER® magazine to your book club or social group to discuss the articles and learn the best ways to protect your cognitive vitality.

Hope-Knot Shop

A beautiful reflection of the brain, both strong and delicate, designed by Mark Lash.

We offer several options; jewelry, scarves, journals, handbags & tee’s.
Will you forget? We Hope-Knot.

 

Events

Join us for interesting events and experiences.

Young or old, socialize and network with like-minded people, and discover the best ways to stay cognitively resilient.

 

Millennial Minds®

Under 40 and want to understand what it takes to stay cognitively healthy throughout your life?

You’re never too young to prevent your own cognitive decline.

Memory Morsels®

Healthy eating is connected to healthy brains.

Memory Morsels® gives you great tasting recipes and tips to help keep your brain functioning the way you want.

Volunteer

Volunteering is a great way to give back to the community, meet new people, and feel good about helping others.

Interested in helping us out?

Brain Buzz

Women’s Brain Health Initiative on the move.

Mind the Gap

Approximately two-thirds of those diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) are women. However, research into sex and gender differences in AD is astonishingly limited. Because the greatest risk factor for dementia is age, the discrepancy between the sexes has historically been attributed to the longevity of women. While it is true…

Dazed & Confused

It is common for women to experience cognitive difficulties, sometimes referred to as “brain fog,” as they go through the menopause transition. They might be forgetful, or have trouble concentrating or thinking clearly. In one study, approximately 62% of midlife women self-reported an undesirable change in memory. Objective measurements of…

Past the Call of Duty

Traumatic brain injury (TBI), post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and depression have been associated with an increased risk of developing dementia, either each on its own or in combination with one another. This is of particular concern for military veterans because they are more likely than civilians to experience any or…

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